Category: Words

Google Save

So Google Save is pretty interesting. I tend to keep stuff in a weird combination of Pocket (for articles), Pinterest (for mood board stuff), a Twitter “read later” list and a few other places. I wonder if this could become a real catch-all for me.

A few observations:

  • You can edit the link title AND description, which is pretty interesting
  • No inline player for YouTube, seem like an oversight
  • No reading mode, so Pocket will still be my go-to place for a raw reading list
  • This seems best used for making Collections of links – think: researching a topic, or collecting links on areas of specific interest
  • You can’t currently share a Tag/collection, but surely that’s coming…

Links:

Paying for mobile games

“It’s time to embrace $10 games on Android. We’re quickly reaching a point where new technology is going to demand a greater expense for a better product, and there’s no reason any game developer that creates something to entertain you for 2+ hours a week for months is considered less valuable than whatever you had for lunch today.”

Russell Holly writing for Android Central

The problem for me here is one of comparisons. I’ll happily pay $10 for a game – but what do I consider $10 worth of value?

On sale, Ori and the Blind Forest was $12, and the Abe’s Oddysee remake is currently $10.

To my mind Alto’s Adventure is sure as hell not worth $10. I’d pay $5 to completely remove the ads I suppose – but now I’m acting all arbitrary. (PS – it’s a good game and you should check it out).

I can understand the idea: “games are worth more, so developers should charge more, and gamers should spend more”, but I think the reality is a bit more complex than that.

Sony is at the forefront of mobile photography innovation

One year ago I tweeted:

“If you haven’t been paying attention, the consumer camera space is erupting right now. Phone cameras lit a fire under the incumbents.”

That was before Sony released the critically acclaimed RX100 (and it’s follow up, the RX100M2). Sony has been pushing extremely hard in this space, releasing innovative and exciting cameras to consumers, while doing great things with glass and image quality at these reduced sizes.

Read more…

Why Chromecast is a big deal

Last week Google surprised the tech punditry by announcing Chromecast, a $35 HDMI dongle that plugs into your TV and plays video that you queue to it from your phone or Chrome browser.

Currently the device has out-of-the-box support for YouTube, Netflix and Google Play – and though that’s it for native support (for now), it can also send any Chrome tab to your TV (which in itself is a pretty great feature) including the ability to fullscreen any video playing in the tab on your TV.

Streaming local files to your TV is in beta, but it looks like the SDK enables a pretty seamless experience streaming from devices to your TV, all making it potentially a legitimate competitor to the 3 year old – and three times more expensive – Apple TV.

Read more…

What is fragmentation, really?

Noted Apple-banger, all round reality distortionaire and snarktopus, John Gruber, recently posted these figures:

“93 Percent of Active iOS Users Are Running iOS 6.” Looks a little different than Android’s numbers.

Andreas Constantinou just tweeted:

State of the fragmented nation: Android vs iOS. One picture, a thousand words,

with a link to a “technically accurate” but ultimately dishonest chart comparing iOS distribution (apples) to Android distribution (oranges) by version.

Read more…