Folder: Links

700 Sharks In The Dark

A single shark is too clumsy to catch even a somnolent grouper. A pack of them is more likely to flush the fish from its hiding place and encircle it. Then they tear it apart. Seen live, the attack is a frenzy that explodes before us. Only later, thanks to a special camera that captures a thousand images a second, are we able to watch the sharks in slow motion and appreciate their efficiency and precision.

Incredible pictures and story from Laurent Ballesta and his team.

Watch Dogs 2 – A Tale Told Before Its Time

David Rayfield:

But let’s turn the clock back to 8th November 2016 again. Trump is elected as US President because of three things: 25% of America votes for him, 25% of America votes for Hillary and 50% of America chose not to vote at all. The world’s jaw drops to the floor. Everyone underestimated this gibbering, damaged man-child and now he’s got his finger on the button. Nobody is in a state to comprehend everyday life because nobody is talking about anything else.

Every conversation inevitably turned to Trump and how this could have happened. What do we do now? What could we have done differently? How badly will this affect everyone outside of America even though the rest of the world had no say in this catastrophe? What we took as normal is thrown out the window and we begin to contemplate just how crazy everything will become. The entire world has changed.

One week later, Watch Dogs 2 is released.

I loved Watch Dogs 2. Loved it. It’s fascinating to revisit it as a piece of art, and examine the themes and narrative in the context of today’s techno-political climate.

PS, Ubisoft, please give this game the 4K update for Xbox that it so obviously deserves. y u no

No, games didn’t just go mainstream

Victoria Rose for Polygon:

Gamers have made standards for remaining the elite, edgy “underground” hobby when that’s not the case at all. Gaming’s “minutes of fame” — mainstream news articles, movie references, song lyrics — are now infinite, as gaming is a constant center of attention.

Everyone games or knows a gamer.

Citizen scientists discovered a new aurora. They called it “Steve”.

Steve, left. (Krista Trinder)

The Atlantic:

This new feature differs from the long-studied “classical” aurora in several ways. It can be seen from much closer to the equator than its more famous twin, and it emanates from a spot twice as high in the sky. It was also first described and studied not by cultivated researchers—like those who coined the moniker aurora borealis—but by devoted amateurs. They were among the first to photograph the ethereal streak of purple light, and they were the first to give it a name.

That name is Steve.

Using only the Pixel 2 XL to photograph the Geneva Motor Show

Vlad Savov left his DSLR at home and relied solely on his Pixel for the entire show.

I literally flew in to Geneva with a Google Pixel 2 XL, my laptop, and the hope that my high esteem for Google’s camera wasn’t misguided. After taking more than 2,000 shots, publishing 303 of them (so far), and then collecting compliments rather than complaints about my photos, I can say that this experiment has been a resounding success.

Amazing results.

Photo: Vlad Savov / The Verge

Steve Francis: I Got a Story to Tell

Steve Francis writing for The Players’ Tribune:

I still live in Houston to this day, and I can walk around this city and no matter what, people got my back. Even when I was going through some dark times the past few years, and I got locked up, everybody in Houston still had my back. How many guys who only played in a city for five years, and only made the playoffs once, get that much love?

I think it’s because of the energy in the city when me and Yao were together. That was my guy. When he came to Houston, we were some Odd Couple motherfuckers, man. A dude from China and a dude from D.C., and it wasn’t even language that was the problem. That was just a part of it. I’m partially deaf in my left ear, and Yao is partially deaf in his right ear, and we’re trying to speak to one another in basic English.

He’s turning his head, Huh?

I’m turning my head, What? Huh?

A genuinely entertaining and well written short-form memoir by Steve Francis covering what amounts to his whole life – from the death of his mother and step father, dealing drugs and visiting prisons to Hakeem, Yao, Gary Payton and Shawn Marion.

A must read for any NBA fan.

Alexa Devices Are Laughing Spontaneously

BuzzFeed:

Owners of Amazon Echo devices with the voice-enabled assistant Alexa have been pretty much creeped out of their damn minds recently. People are reporting that the bot sometimes spontaneously starts laughing — which is basically a bloodcurdling nightmare.

2018 being pretty 2018 on this one.

Ends and means

Jeremy Keith:

I remember feeling very heartened to see WikiPedia, Google and others take a stand on January 18th, 2012. But I also remember feeling uneasy. In this particular case, companies were lobbying for a cause I agreed with. But what if they were lobbying for a cause I didn’t agree with? Large corporations using their power to influence politics seems like a very bad idea. Isn’t it still a bad idea, even if I happen to agree with the cause?

There’s an uncomfortable tension here. When do the ends justify the means? Isn’t the whole point of having principles that they hold true even in the direst circumstances? Why even claim that corporations shouldn’t influence politics if you’re going to make an exception for net neutrality? Why even claim that free speech is sacrosanct if you make an exception for nazi scum?

Those two examples are pretty extreme and I can easily justify the exceptions to myself. Net neutrality is too important. Stopping fascism is too important. But where do I draw the line? At what point does something become “too important?”

There are more subtle examples of corporations wielding their power. Google are constantly using their monopoly position in search and browser marketshare to exert influence over website-builders. In theory, that’s bad. But in practice, I find myself agreeing with specific instances. Prioritising mobile-friendly sites? Sounds good to me. Penalising intrusive ads? Again, that seems okey-dokey to me. But surely that’s not the point. So what if I happen to agree with the ends being pursued? The fact that a company the size and power of Google is using their monopoly for any influence is worrying, regardless of whether I agree with the specific instances.

Google’s handling of HTTPS and AMP is fascinating to watch. It seems that really smart people are worried about how this will all end up. I find myself identifying strongly with the above. Read the whole piece.

Daily Links

A Data Scientist Was Sick of Seeing Spam on His Facebook so He Built a Fake News Detector

A Data Scientist Was Sick of Seeing Spam on His Facebook so He Built a Fake News Detector

“I see my friends post, sometimes, complete garbage or articles recommended to me that are complete garbage.”

motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/7x7mda/fake-news-detector-neural-network-ai-machine-learning/

4G found on Moon

4G found on Moon

Vodafone’s network will be used to set up the Moon’s first 4G network, connecting two Audi Lunar Quattro rovers to a base station in the Autonomous Landing and Navigation Module.

www.theregister.co.uk/2018/02/27/4g_found_on_moon/

 

Torching the Modern-Day Library of Alexandria

James Somers writing for The Atlantic:

Google’s secret effort to scan every book in the world, codenamed “Project Ocean,” began in earnest in 2002 when Larry Page and Marissa Mayer sat down in the office together with a 300-page book and a metronome. Page wanted to know how long it would take to scan more than a hundred-million books, so he started with one that was lying around. Using the metronome to keep a steady pace, he and Mayer paged through the book cover-to-cover. It took them 40 minutes.

With that 40-minute number in mind, Page approached the University of Michigan, his alma mater and a world leader in book scanning, to find out what the state of the art in mass digitization looked like. Michigan told him that at the current pace, digitizing their entire collection—7 million volumes—was going to take about a thousand years. Page, who’d by now given the problem some thought, replied that he thought Google could do it in six.

An absolutely fascinating dive into the history of Project Ocean, covering how it started at Google, how Google scanned the books (camera arrays, clever algorithms and human page turners), and the years-long legal wrangle between Google, the Authors Guild and the DOJ.

It’s there. The books are there. People have been trying to build a library like this for ages—to do so, they’ve said, would be to erect one of the great humanitarian artifacts of all time—and here we’ve done the work to make it real and we were about to give it to the world and now, instead, it’s 50 or 60 petabytes on disk, and the only people who can see it are half a dozen engineers on the project who happen to have access because they’re the ones responsible for locking it up.

Interestingly Page later opined during a Q&A that maybe it would be a good idea to “set aside a part of the world” to try out some “exciting things you could do that are illegal or not allowed by regulation.” He was roundly criticised for being an annoying, out-of-touch billionaire at the time, but perhaps he was just being wistful.

Daily Links

The fake social media profiles helping American rappers blow up in Russia

The fake social media profiles helping American rappers blow up in Russia

To the casual American rap fan, Night Lovell’s Russian popularity seems beyond random. But Russia’s young rap fans have constructed their own shadow rap ecosystem, skirting many of the power brokers that guide taste and collect income for artists in the states.

theoutline.com/post/3528/the-russian-rap-internet-is-nothing-like-you-think

Nokia’s banana phone from The Matrix is back

Nokia’s banana phone from The Matrix is back

Now HMD, makers of Nokia-branded phones, is bringing the Nokia 8110 back to life as a retro classic.

www.theverge.com/2018/2/25/17044634/nokia-8110-matrix-banana-phone-mwc-2018

Raptors’ DeRozan hopes honest talk on depression helps others

Raptors’ DeRozan hopes honest talk on depression helps others | Toronto Star

All-star DeMar DeRozan copes with troubled times — hinted at in all-star weekend tweet that sparked a wave of support — by throwing his life into his family and his basketball: “Sometimes . . . it gets the best of you.”

www.thestar.com/sports/raptors/2018/02/25/raptors-derozan-hopes-honest-talk-on-depression-helps-others.html

Trump vs. “disease X”

Trump vs. “disease X”

But further down on the WHO list was a threat ominously described as “disease X.” The X stands for an unknown: a pathogen lurking out there, currently being harbored in animals, with the potential to make the dangerous leap into humans and spread suffering and death around the globe.

www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/2/23/16974012/trump-pandemic-disease-response/

A Researcher Just Found A 9,000-Video Network Of YouTube Conspiracy Videos

Buzzfeed:

Albright said the results suggest that the conspiracy genre is embedded so deeply into YouTube’s video culture that it could be nearly impossible to eradicate.

“It’s already tipped in favor of the conspiracists, I think,” Albright told BuzzFeed News. “There are a handful of debunking videos in the data. They can’t make up for the thousands of videos with false claims and rumors.”

Albright also suggested that the proliferation of these videos makes it more attractive for others to create this content.

To anyone who dabbles in occasional conspiracy-theory deep dives on YouTube, this rings true. There is an absolute avalanche of dipshit conspiracies on YouTube, and most people lack the mental dexterity to tell that a video is playing loose with the facts – especially if it meshes nicely with their existing worldview.

Less common is the conspiracy parody. The Outline absolutely nailed it with this gem:

I’ve often thought a conspiracy channel would be an easy way to make some quick beer money, but it seems I’m much too late to the game.

Or am I?

Yes, I am.

Where the ‘Crisis Actor’ Conspiracy Theory Comes From

Jason Koebler, Motherboard:

The term ‘crisis actor’ has been in the news a lot lately, because conspiracy theorists have accused survivors of the Douglas High School mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, of being actors—people paid to pretend they witnessed a horrible tragedy that actually never happened and was instead staged by the government in order to garner the political will necessary to ban guns.

To be clear, there is no evidence this is actually the case. Conspiracy theorists have questioned the legitimacy of people who lived through a horrific shooting—watched their friends and classmates slaughtered—in an attempt to harass and silence their political activism.

It wasn’t until relatively recently that conspiracy theorists were audacious enough to suggest that terrorist attacks and mass shootings actually didn’t happen at all.

A good backgrounder on the origins of the horseshit “Crisis Actor” conspiracies.

Semi-regular reminder that false-flaggers are scum.

Twitter: You can actually ban the Nazis

Paris Martineau writing for The Outline:

THE MARKETPLACE OF IDEAS WAS A LIE

Years of outbursts from hate group after hate group have forced these companies to realize that the laissez-faire attitude they’ve leaned on for so long doesn’t actually work, but rather, makes the entire thing rot from the inside. But the fact that platforms won’t fully commit to managing the content that people spew on these platforms leaves a vacuum of confusion and hypotheticals, which generally (like all things nowadays) lead to conspiracies and misinformation.

In all this time, no company has actually tried totally depriving bad ideas of oxygen. Trust me, this is a sentence I never thought I’d say, but in times like these, Twitter (and the tech world as a whole, really) could learn a thing or two from Medium.

One of the multitude of problems Twitter is currently facing is that they just can’t make up their mind about what they want their platform to be.

I recently copped a 7-day account suspension for calling Dinesh D’Souza a cunt and a piece of shit (more on that episode later). Plenty of people replied telling him to go fuck himself, Ron Perlman quoted him calling him a piece of shit multiple times and suggesting it would be best if D’Souza disappeared himself, CPAC (seriously) called D’Souza’s comments “indefensible”, and D’Souza eventually deleted his tweet and apologised.

For some reason though, I’m still in the time-out corner.

The truth is, Twitter has no real expected standard of behaviour. They’re happy to put me in time out for using the word “cunt” while simultaneously leaving this disgusting tweet up on their platform…

… in spite of the fact Coulter’s tweet blatantly violates Twitter’s Hateful conduct policy, and calling someone a “cunt” definitively doesn’t.

Twitter, you are pretty broken for a lot of reasons, but one thing you might want to focus on is the quality of the content of some of the biggest voices on your platform. And if Speech (capital “S”) really is your North Star, maybe don’t haphazardly hand out suspensions to passionate, long-time users for using “bad words”. You silly cunts.

Daily Links

In Edo Japan, Artists Captured Whales Like Never Before

In Edo Japan, Artists Captured Whales Like Never Before

The whaling industry was an important economic force in both the United States and Japan, but each society captured the subject matter very differently in art.

hyperallergic.com/427016/enlightened-encounters-manjiro-nakahama-east-unlocks-its-gates/

Erasing history

Erasing history

When an online news outlet goes out of business, its archives can disappear as well. The new battle over journalism’s digital legacy.

www.cjr.org/special_report/microfilm-newspapers-media-digital.php?utm_content=buffer77d4b/

Is It Possible to Game the Apple Podcast Charts?

Is It Possible to Game the Apple Podcast Charts? | Discover the Best Podcasts | Discover Pods

Is it possible to manipulate or hack the Apple Podcast charts to make a given podcast appear in the top 10? We look into the evidence where this may have happened.

discoverpods.com/game-hack-manipulate-apple-podcast-charts-itunes/

‘I’m More Afraid of Climate Change Than I Am of Prison’

‘I’m Just More Afraid of Climate Change Than I Am of Prison’

How a group of five activists called the Valve Turners decided to fight global warming by doing whatever it takes.

mobile.nytimes.com/2018/02/13/magazine/afraid-climate-change-prison-valve-turners-global-warming.html

“An Ass-Backward Tech Company”: How Twitter Lost the Internet War

“Just an Ass-Backward Tech Company”: How Twitter Lost the Internet War

Twitter faces more challenges than most technology companies: ISIS terrorists, trolls, bots, and Donald Trump. But its last line of defense, the company’s head of trust and safety, Del Harvey, isn’t making things easier.

www.vanityfair.com/news/2018/02/how-twitter-lost-the-internet-war/

Daily Links

I Watched All 629 Episodes of The Simpsons in a Month. Here’s What I Learned.

I Watched All 629 Episodes of The Simpsons in a Month. Here’s What I Learned.

The show hates Lisa. Before I explain what I mean, let’s back up for a second…

antihumansite.wordpress.com/2018/02/09/i-watched-all-629-episodes-of-the-simpsons-in-a-month-heres-what-i-learned/

Lost wreckage of ‘British Roswell’ flying saucer discovered in Science Museum

Lost wreckage of ‘British Roswell’ flying saucer discovered in Science Museum

“One of the museum staff tapped me on the shoulder and asked if I was aware that ‘bits of a flying saucer’ had been kept in a cigarette tin in the museum group store for decades.”

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/02/11/lost-wreckage-british-roswell-flying-saucer-discovered-science/

The Best SpaceX Conspiracies About the Falcon Heavy Launch

The Best SpaceX Conspiracies About the Falcon Heavy Launch

Did Elon Musk pull off the perfect murder? And other things conspiracy theorists are wondering.

motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/gy8vqw/spacex-conspiracy-falcon-heavy-tesla/