Sony is at the forefront of mobile photography innovation

One year ago I tweeted:

“If you haven’t been paying attention, the consumer camera space is erupting right now. Phone cameras lit a fire under the incumbents.”

That was before Sony released the critically acclaimed RX100 (and it’s follow up, the RX100M2). Sony has been pushing extremely hard in this space, releasing innovative and exciting cameras to consumers, while doing great things with glass and image quality at these reduced sizes.

These Sony “QX” Lens cameras may seem gimmicky, but they’re the first step into yet more uncharted territory, forcing the whole space to innovate faster.

QX2

$450 does seem pricey for what, at a glance, looks like just a bluetooth lens – but the 1-inch 20.2-megapixel Exmor R sensor and a f/1.8-4.9 Carl Zeiss lens make it the hardware equivalent of an RX100M2, generally accepted as the best point-and-shoot in the world.

These QX lenses may not be a commercial success, but the future of mobile photography is looking pretty amazing.


Update: The Verge went hands-on:

Lion’s Inverted Scroll

How do you Lion users find the “opposite” scroll? Haven’t used it yet, but seems mental to me that they’ve forgone decades of UI convention to align this operation on a desktop OS closer to a touch device.

By getting used to the inverted scroll do you eventually imagine your fingers actually grabbing the screen and flinging it up – al-la a touch screen?

Here’s noted Apple-banger, John Gruber:

“My number one Lion tip: No matter how wrong it feels, stick with the new trackpad scrolling direction. Give it a week. At first it will drive you far crazier than you expect, but then you’ll get used to it.”

But… WHY?

Why the hell should we subject ourselves to a week of pain, when there is NOTHING broken with the current convention? If inverting will “drive you far crazier than you expect” then how is it an improvement worth inflicting on millions of users?